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Test for your sweat rate

Every IRONMAN competitor anticipates, experiments, and maybe stresses a bit (or a lot) about race day nutrition, starting with the foundation of fluid replacement. They appreciate that dehydration can slow you down, wreak havoc with your gastrointestinal system, and lead to overheating. On the flip side, over hydrating increases your risk for developing exercise associated hyponatremia, a fluid overload condition characterized by abnormally low levels of blood sodium that can be serious and even fatal. To find your own hydration sweet spot for race day—not too much and not too little—you can set up a process to check your sweat rate throughout your training season.

Got thirst?

You may have heard recently that thirst should drive your drinking. While this is safe and prudent for the recreational exerciser to prevent fluid overload, we can all appreciate that Ironman events are not casual, no matter your race day goals. Just as you have a planned race day pace, you should also have a paced plan for hydration during the bike and run. However, endurance athletes will need to be prepared to adapt and adjust on race day as well.

Getting started

Start by collecting your own sweat data. You can start anytime, but should do this throughout the training season to capture changes in your sweat rate that occur with increased fitness, acclimatization, increased training intensity, and of course the full smorgasbord of potential weather conditions. Creating a flow sheet for tracking is wise as this allows you to review data from the past as you develop and refine your hydration. Race day weather can differ greatly from recent training conditions due to travel to other climates and venues famous for labile weather conditions. Looking back at your records allows you to confidently tweak your race nutrition plan accordingly as the race day weather forecast emerges.

How to check your sweat rate

Begin to think of your sweat losses as an hourly rate specific to the bike and to the run. Fueling guidelines are also described at carbohydrates per hour, so this is a good base for your full race nutrition plan development.

While you are preparing for a long race, it is best to check sweat losses during shorter workouts- about 60 to 90 minutes. That’s because you burn stored fuel or muscle glycogen during exercise, contributing to the weight loss. Longer workouts mean more glycogen and water loss, so it throws off the data.

It is also important to be well hydrated prior to workouts when you are completing a sweat check. Weighing sweaty clothes and hair also throws off your calculations as does consuming solid or semi-solid products during the workout, so stick with liquids.

Originally from: http://www.ironman.com/triathlon/news/articles/2015/11/calculate-your-sweat-rate.aspx#ixzz4vFxTn93z

Originally from: http://www.ironman.com/triathlon/news/articles/2015/11/calculate-your-sweat-rate.aspx#ixzz4vFtJmQic

THE TEST

1) Weigh yourself nude right before a run (or bike).

2) Run at race pace for one hour, keeping track of how much you drink (in ounces) during the run (or bike).

3) After the run, strip down, towel off any sweat, and weigh yourself nude again.

4) Subtract your weight from your prerun weight and convert to ounces. Then add to that number however many ounces of liquid you consumed on your run (or bike).(1 pound = 1 pint or 16 oz. of water)

(For example, if you lost a pound and drank 16 ounces of fluid, your total fluid loss is 32 ounces.)

5) To determine how much you should be drinking about every 15 minutes, divide your hourly fluid loss by 4 (in the above example it would be 8 ounces).

Other Thoughts:

  • Many factors affect the sweat rate!  Check out the Electrolyte podcast for further educational information!
  • Because the test only determines your sweat losses for the environmental conditions you run in that day, you should retest on another day when conditions are different to see how your sweat rate is affected. You should also redo the test during different seasons, in different environments (such as higher or lower altitudes), and as you become faster, since pace also affects your sweat rate.
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Food prep for the busy triathlete

No one is going to argue that eating well is super important. Now what to eat ... thats a different blog for a different time. 😎🥳

We aren't going to argue that food is fuel. And a lot of us understand that food is so much more than fuel. And one of the biggest things that we ARE NOT is CONSISTENT. So enter the habit of food prepping.

  • Carbs, proteins and fats provide the energy to burn
  • Micronutrients like vitamin c and magnesium support a plethora (PLETHORA) of processes that go on in the body. Like magnesium so you don't cramp and have restless legs at night.
  • Phyto-chemicals or plant substrates do a ton of stuff like protect your DNA, protect against cancer, decrease the risk of heart disease and on and on.
  • Zoo-chemicals or animal provided substrates reduce inflammation and blood clotting, suppress cancer cell development and inhibit complications from diabetes to hit some big ones.
  • You also get some organic molecules form your food that help, such as bacteria that helps your body to produce B12.

So in order for the triathlete to achieve the following, we need to do our best to eat right. In my experience and training, the majority (75 to 90% of women triathletes aren't eating enough calories, a different blog for a different time, and certainly not getting all the "stuff" from food that they need.

  • Fuel your body for activity
  • Provide the basic building blocks, like sodium, in order to support the activity AND do vital jobs like keep your brain cool so you don't melt your brain and die (thats how the body thinks of it).
  • Provide the building blocks like amino acids to aide in recovery and repair. Why do a hard work out if in 10 days you aren't going to see the results because you didn't eat good enough to give the body what it needs?
  • Support all the hormonal functions like sleeping well, regulating metabolism, keeping that sex drive UP, supporting bone health and the list goes on and on and on ...
  • Keeping you from getting sick. Let's be real ... who wants to get sick when the training gets really real? How does it feel to miss that LONG brick?
  • Keeps your brain happy
  • Which keeps the house happy
  • Insert beautiful orchestra chord.

So here are some simple ideas on how to look at food prep. WHICH STARTS AT THE STORE!

Admittedly, this one is for those that are ok with the Zoo-chemicals.

  • Hard Boiled Eggs: Cook a dozen or more and have sitting in your frig. Adding sirachi mayo or something to spice it up is a wonderful snack. And salt. ADD THE SALT.
  • NUTS: Brazil nuts for the guys which provides selenium for better testosterone levels. Ladies too. You need this. Salted almonds. Cashews. Nut butters.
  • AVOCADOS: Great source of fat and protein. Be mindful that there are some carbs in them. OH THE SALT!!! ;)
  • Cook up hamburger patties and store in the frig. Like 10 of them. Then you can add a bit of a dressing or tear up into a quick salad or mix with some sautéed veggies that you prepped.
  • Sautéed Veggies: chop up some veggies, add the garlic and onions (stupid good for female health and heart health). Add to meals when you are rolling through your day.
  • Breakfast burritos: Cook up veggies, scrambled eggs (like 12 of them), and make a whole pan of yumminess. Then package in a torilla wrap. You can add flaxseed and other goodness to kick it up a notch.
  • Cook beets like eggs and have them in the frig to eat ala cart or add to your smoothies.
  • Breakfast: handful of nuts, a bit of oatmeal, a bit of berries and add extras. Put in food prep containers and BOOM! Add hot water to eat. On the GO GO GO nutrition.
  • Purchase clean family serving dishes of meat. BOOM!
  • Get containers to put in breakfast, salads, dinner, etc.

There are so many things that you can do if you practice and get into the habit of prep prep. Plus if you are just a bit more mindful, you can involve your kids and teach them vital and precious skills for cooking and the LOVE for good food. TO LOVE THEIR BODIES. To nurture themselves. This is one of the biggest things we need to be role modeling to our little people. You can get your spouses involved. If you are a lady ironman in training, this is one great way of involving that husband that might get to feeling left out. I'm not saying give him the task of meal food prepping and all that, just a little bit of involvement will go a long way to not leaving him on the side of the street.

CONSISTENCY!!!! Being consistent and having the attitude that we need to take care of our bodies, not keep pushing pushing pushing, we will get way better results and in general be more content and happy. And everyone around you will benefit. :)

Plus this is more time efficient so you will rock out mid and later in the week when training and life has got you pressed. You can throw together a wonderful meal and then someone will probably rub your feet because your a super mom or dad or whatever. :) <3

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