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Tag Archives: Fueling

Paleo and Whole30

whole30-vs-paleoWhole30 and Paleo are two eating programs that are very similar. In fact, in a nutshell, Whole30 is simply a more strict version of Paleo. Both programs focus on consuming whole, clean, natural foods. Both Whole30 and Paleo ban eating:    


  • processed foods
  • grains
  • dairy
  • alcohol
  • legumes
Whole30 vs. Paleo: On The Subject of Sugar The major practical difference between Whole30 and Paleo is that Whole30 doesn’t allow any kind of added sugar, while Paleo only rules out refined sugar (so for example, you can have honey with Paleo, but not with Whole30). As a side note, one other small difference is that Whole30 advises against trying to imitate your favorite baked goodies or junk food with approved ingredients (so imitation pancakes would be off the list). However, it’s common (and encouraged) for Paleo eaters to recreate their favorite sweets with ingredient adjustments. Difference Between Paleo and Whole30: The Form The biggest difference between Paleo and Whole30 is the form of how each diet is carried out. Whole30 is designed to be a very strict 30 day program to cleanse and reset your body. While some of the habits you gain from Whole30 will hopefully be maintained, it isn’t intended to be a permanent practice. Most of the benefits from Whole30 diet come from learning about your relationship to food and discovering how to modify unhealthy eating habits. Paleo, on the other hand, is a long-term eating lifestyle. Since it’s designed to be long-term, rules are a bit more relaxed. Many Paleo eaters also think of Paleo as a loose template – some will add in dairy or or alcohol here and there. Paleo is more a general mindset, and with so many modifications, people often define a Paleo lifestyle differently. Many individuals use Whole30 as a launching pad into a more long-term Paleo lifestyle, or to reset their eating habits when they’ve strayed too far from the Paleo practice. Ultimately, the two programs resemble one another very closely. The main difference lies in the diet’s form.

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Magnesium is CRITICALLY important for the person and the ENDURANCE Athlete

Magnesium deficiency...what foods are good sources of magnesium? Is magnesium important for training and racing, or for general health?

CHECK OUT what Dr. Marshall Porterfield from NASA says about magnesium.

[audio mp3="http://www.bonniekissinger.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/Podcast-Magnesium-M-Porterfield.mp3"][/audio] [box] Magnesium is involved in numerous processes that affect muscle function including oxygen uptake, energy production and electrolyte balance. Thus, the relationship between magnesium status and exercise has received significant research attention. This research has shown that exercise induces a redistribution of magnesium in the body to accommodate metabolic needs. There is evidence that marginal magnesium deficiency impairs exercise performance and amplifies the negative consequences of strenuous exercise (e.g., oxidative stress). [/box] Magnesium is an essential mineral that demands attention when it comes to health assessment. It is required by virtually every cell, and it’s vital in more than 300 chemical processes that sustain basic human health and function, including muscle contraction and relaxation, nerve function, cardiac activity, blood pressure regulation, hormonal interactions, immunity, bone health and synthesis of proteins, fats and nucleic acids. Magnesium is also crucial for energy metabolism by the activation of enzymes known as ATPases, which are needed to generate ATP (adenosine triphosphate). When ATP is broken down, energy is released for all muscle contractions, and when exercising strenuously, this turnover is extremely high, meaning that ATP needs to be synthesized quickly. Thus a shortfall of magnesium can limit energy production, leading to fatigue, lethargy, reduced power, muscle twitches or cramps. Chronic deficiencies of magnesium are also implicated in reduced bone mineral density and increased risk of osteoporosis as well as anemia, depression and irregular heart rate. Virtually every body system can display symptoms because systems throughout the body rely on magnesium. Athletes in particular might find it easy to explain away fatigue or muscle cramps, lowered immunity, and even altered heart rates, and indeed these symptoms are common and multi-faceted in cause. However, a simple magnesium deficiency could also be the underlying factor. There is emerging evidence that magnesium requirements are significantly elevated in athletes, and that performance might benefit from higher intakes. Aside from being used up in the production of energy, magnesium might also assist performance by reducing accumulation of lactic acid and reducing the perception of fatigue during strenuous exercise through its action on the nervous system. Magnesium is also lost through sweat, so athletes training hard in hot and humid environments might further increase demands. [box]

Magnesium Depletion

The "Journal of Nutrition" reported on a study in 2002 that examined the effect of magnesium depletion on cardiac function and energy needs during exercise. Post-menopausal women were put on a diet supplemented with 200 mg of magnesium, followed by a non-supplemented diet. The restriction of dietary magnesium resulted in decreased magnesium concentrations in the body, which translated to poor cardiovascular function and poor energy during exercise, the study showed.

Effect of High Intensity Exercise on Magnesium Concentration

A 2006 review by Forrest Nielson and associates reported in the journal "Magnesium Research" stated that your body responds to exercise by redistributing its supply of magnesium. Concentration of magnesium in the blood increases by 5 to 15 percent after short bouts of high-intensity exercise. An increase is also seen after moderate exercise that is done over an extended period. This is a transient change, however, with plasma levels returning to normal within a day. Possible explanations put forward for this phenomenon include decreased plasma volume, muscle breakdown and transfer of magnesium out of the muscles during contractions.

Endurance Exercise and Magnesium

According to the Nielson study, there is evidence that cross country skiing, marathon running and other extended endurance exercises decrease plasma magnesium concentration. This may be the effect of increased loss of magnesium through sweat and urine, and the movement of magnesium into other areas of the body. The explanation seems to be that your body sends magnesium to the parts of the body with the greatest metabolic need, where increased energy production is required. [/box] Magnesium is not produced by the body, so it needs to be ingested daily through the consumption of magnesium-rich foods such as whole grain cereals, leafy greens, nuts and seeds. Magnesium deficiency is actually quite common—dietary surveys indicate more than 70 percent of the population consumes insufficient magnesium. This is probably because our eating habits generally rely on processed, high-starch and refined foods, which are all poor sources of this vital mineral. Eating a variety of food will help you meet and maintain magnesium requirements, and provide you with other essential vitamins and minerals. Pumpkin seeds are one great source of magnesium and an easy addition to any diet—add them to cereal, salads, pasta and rice dishes for extra crunch or simply eat a handful as an afternoon snack. Spinach and kale are also rich in magnesium, but some magnesium is lost through the cooking process. Some common foods might also be magnesium fortified, and certain sports foods and supplements do recognize this important mineral by including it in significant amounts. All of these sources contribute to overall requirements, so check labels to gauge your intake before turning to a supplement. The recommended daily allowance for the general population is a minimum of 300 to 350 mg for women and 400 to 450 mg for men. Research suggests that endurance athletes can safely consume 500 to 800 mg daily, and there is debate as to whether this amount should be higher still. Aside from poor dietary intake, there are other potentially serious factors that may cause a magnesium deficiency, such as gastrointestinal absorption problems, physical stresses such as illness or even very cold weather, alcoholism and diabetes. Additionally, medications, prescription and non-prescription, and/or other supplements can interact with magnesium and its absorption or action within the body. So it’s important to first discuss with your doctor your own circumstances and any other medical issues that may be causing your low magnesium status and whether supplementation is required in addition to eating magnesium-rich foods. Source: Triathlete, Pip Taylor Jan 14, 2015

Magnesium-Rich Foods

Brazil nuts225Sesame seeds200
Pumpkin seeds (roasted) 532
Almonds 300
Peanuts (roasted, salted) 183
Walnuts 158
Rice 110
Whole-grain bread 85
Spinach 80
Cooked beans 40
Broccoli 30
Banana 29
Potato (baked) 25
(Milligrams per 100 grams).

References

[tie_list type="checklist"]
  • Office of Dietary Supplements: Magnesium
  • "British Journal of Sports Medicine": Oral Magnesium Therapy; R. Pokan; 2006
  • "The Journal of Nutrition": Dietary Magnesium Affects Metabolic Response; H. Lukaski; May 2002
  • "Magnesium Research": Relationship Between Magnesium and Exercise; F. Nielson; September 2006
  • USDA nutrient database
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Slightly chubby Irongirl

I've always struggled with weight. I've weighed 210 pounds. That's size 16. I'm around a lot of skinny people.

I JUDGE MYSELF. HIGHLY CRITICAL.
I just might have an "I'm enough" issue deep down. Expressing itself as a body self esteem issue. Seriously? Two years ago I couldn't run 1 mile without stopping 3 times and taking 17 minutes. I'm in the best shape of my life. I'm the healthiest I've ever been. I'm gonna be an Ironman soon. That little belief is a BIG FAT LIAR. I'M ENOUGH. All 156 pounds of me. (maybe more than enough.  maybe super forkin' fabulous!)

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What is detox?

Detoxification is the process of removing toxic substances from a person’s body. It's an everyday process.  Minute by minute, hour by hour.  When our body is working well, this process goes on without a hitch. These toxins we need to get rid of aren't just the bad crap from our processed food, etc.  It's also from the natural side product of metabolism.  Detox shouldn't be a mysterious word.  Toxins shouldn't be either.  It's just what it is. Now you can put in LESS toxins.  You can help your body do better with daily detox. THE LIVER.  I like to call it the aquarium filter.  It does a big job.  More on that later.  Here's the deal.  You're body can deal with a lot of abuse.  You treat it well, you can push it more.  You eat more fruits and veggies, you can deal more with the less than optimal food, or lifestyle habits, extensive exercise, etc. But if you don't make some educated choices, that filter gets REAL SMELLY and the fish start floating.  Or you get sick.  Or you don't sleep well.  Or you are always tired.  Or your performance is lower.  Or  you get a disease of some sort. I'll be putting together a class on detox.  How to make some changes so this becomes a way of life for you, without you really even thinking about it much.  (it's all about the poohs!)  I can't wait to show this to you.  But lets start HERE! WATER WATER WATER.  Clean water.  Just plain water.  You can add lemon, lime, raspberries, etc.  First step in this lifestyle change is to ensure that you are drinking 8 glasses of water a day. If you have that down ... more fiber.  Next week I'll send out fiber help. Check out the smoothie recipes if you wanting to go a step further now.  The super green one is GREAT. CLICK HERE FOR POWER SMOOTHIE Til later.  Rock out!

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What is Weight Loss?

A balanced approach

I've been thinking a bit on why there are so many different kinds of diets.  And why so many of them don't work.  One reason is because we look at weight loss as a separate event.  Like painting the house.  Instead of a part of our lives that is influenced by many aspects of our lives.  There are MANY factors that contribute to weight gain.  Not all of them are immediately under our control.  Granted our habits might have gotten us to a point where weight loss is hard but after cleaning things up, you just might have residue affects that you aren't obviously aware of that are slowing you down.  Example.  Clogged up liver.  Eating a food you have no idea you are sensitive to.  Missing a couple of nutrients. Another thought to throw your weigh.  Maybe there are so many weight loss programs because we just aren't getting to the heart of the matter and these programs are a brute force way of losing weight.  Which in the end, doesn't stick.  Doesn't translate into lifestyle changes.  WHY?  Because they are sustainable.  So ... should you lose weight in a manner that isn't a healthy lifestyle change?  Short term gain for .... what?  Closet full of clothes of many sizes. wellness-playbookSo what to do.  Well, we are all individuals.  Gloriously unique.  So our approach to weight loss will be unique.  Now, that's not to say that their won't have a similar foundation, but everyone will have different needs.  That sounds complicated, but actually, it's not that hard.  Takes some patience.  Some investigation.  Some experimentation. My Wellness Coaching Playbook, which can be tailored for your goal, is an awesome way to find your individualize plan.  You'll learn the skills to find your own solution --> lifestyle changes.

Healthier Living

In the end, if you do your homework, you'll find your lifestyle change.  If you just want a pill .... are you prepared to buy that pill, and others later, for the rest of your life? Where's the Playbook?  Let's set up a chat.

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Parkinson’s – Your Diet can have a POSITIVE impact.

Here is some information I have put together from various sources and time spent doing research. The information is meant to give you food for thought. Ask your doctor. Do some research. I'm upset at the fact that of all of the people I know with Parkinson's, their MD's are telling them that their diet can have an impact. Some of this information isn't in layman's terms, so bear with it. Use it as a bouncing off point to go learn more yourself. Information is POWER.

Hear me please: YOUR DIET CAN HAVE A POSITIVE IMPACT!

(NaturalNews) Parkinson's disease is the second most common degenerative disorder of the central nervous system after Alzheimer's disease. It is estimated that 1% of individuals over the age of 65 are diagnosed with this disorder. Lifestyle can have an impact on Parkinson's disease.
(bonnie) CHECK THIS OUT: In general, it is agreed that it is one of the most common neurological diseases affecting adults over the age of 65. Diagnoses of the Disease in adults between the ages of 40 and 65 has increased in the past few decades, though as yet there is no attributable cause. Because of its relatively slow progress, a person diagnosed with Parkinsons Disease may live another 40-50 years, with increasing disability. [tie_list type="checklist"]
  • One person in every 200 will be diagnosed with the Disease in their lifetime.
  • One out of every 100 people over 60 in the United States will be diagnosed with the Disease.
  • There are over 50,000 new diagnosed cases of the disease in the United States every year.
[/tie_list]
(NaturalNews) Parkinson's particularly affects a region of the basal ganglia called the substantia nigra. The basal ganglia are a group of brain structures that utilize dopamine as their primary neurotransmitter. Neuronal loss in these regions is associated with brain cell inflammation and the formation of cross-linked proteins called Lewy bodies in the remaining nerve cells. Lewy bodies are protein aggregates that form and block normal cellular activity. The most common symptoms of Parkinson's include movement related disorders such as shaking, rigidity, difficulty walking and slowness of movement. As the disease progresses, it leads to cognitive and behavioral problems such as dementia, insomnia and irritability.

Type II Diabetes Dramatically Increases Parkinson Disease Risk

Researchers in Finland have found that individuals with type II diabetes have an 83% greater risk of developing Parkinson's. Elevated blood sugar is known to link with protein structures in a process called glycation. This reaction of reducing sugars connecting to amino acids creates advanced glycolytic enzymes (AGE's). AGE's are especially dangerous and create massive amounts of free radicals. AGE damage in the basal ganglia region is associated with Lewy body formation. These structures are created and aggregate in the basal ganglia due to excessive oxidative stress within the sensitive neuronal tissues. Oxidative stress in the brain is most commonly associated with blood sugar imbalances and environmental toxins (such as heavy metals and organic toxins like pesticides and herbicides). British studies have linked users of conventional herbicide weed killers and pesticide fly killers to be almost twice as likely to form Parkinson's disease. Many of these products kill weeds and bugs by affecting protein chemistry within the organism. This seems to clearly have deleterious effects on humans as well. The greatest potential sources of exposure include crop spraying, weed killers, pesticides and insecticides used in the garden, and fly sprays and ant powders used in the home. The key to preventing and reversing Parkinson's disease is to begin with an anti-inflammatory diet and lifestyle. This includes lots of clean water and phytonutrient rich raw and lightly cooked vegetables. Good fats such as avocados, olive oil, nuts/seeds and coconut products should be strongly encouraged. Healthy animal products such as grass-fed beef, bison, lamb, antelope, deer and free-range chicken, turkey and eggs are also good sources. Sugar and food sources that metabolize into sugar such as grains and fruits should be used minimally. Anti-inflammatory herbs such as turmeric, ginger, cinnamon, garlic, and rosemary among others should be used at every possible chance. High quality omega-3 fatty acids with astaxanthin are especially important for stabilizing neuronal cell membranes. Astaxanthin has very strong anti-oxidant effects that are especially good at protecting against lipid peroxidation, which damages cell membranes. It is very important for individuals, who are suffering from Parkinson's or are susceptible to the disease, to boost intracellular glutathione levels. Glutathione (GSH) is a very special peptide molecule that provides the greatest anti-oxidant protection and recharges other anti-oxidants within the body. Non-denatured, grass-fed whey protein is the best natural food source for glutathione precursors such as cysteine and glutamic acid. And it comes full circle. Check out my article on GLUTATHIONE. Check out JUICE PLUS. So many key antioxidants and power ingredients that each and every cell needs to function and protect itself. Make a positive impact. Right now! More to come on this topic!

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The Role of Antioxidants in the Endurance Athlete – By Dr. David Phillips

The Role of Antioxidants in the Endurance Athlete

by David Phillips M.D. Much has been talked about in the sports and science community about the adverse affects of prolonged and strenuous exercise as it relates to the production of free radicals in an athlete’s body. What are these byproducts of aerobic exercise and why are they damaging to the human body? More importantly, what role do antioxidants play in neutralizing these damaging molecules and what can we as athletes do to facilitate this protective process?

The 'Radical' Concept

Free radicals are highly reactive species produced during various molecular processes in the human body. While environmental factors such as pollution, radiation and cigarette smoke can spawn free radicals, in this article we will focus on those free radicals produced during endurance exercise. Free radicals are atoms or groups of atoms with an odd or unpaired number of electrons and can be formed when oxygen interacts with certain molecules. Once formed, these reactive radicals can start a chain reaction, similar to a domino effect. In other words, these compounds attack the nearest stable molecule, “stealing” its electrons in order to gain stability. When the “attacked” molecule loses its electron, it becomes a free radical itself, beginning a chain reaction. Once the process is started it can cascade, resulting in the disruption of a living cell. Free radical damage not only contributes to accelerated aging, it also causes damage to immune cells. It’s not uncommon for endurance athletes such as triathletes or marathoners to have a higher incidence of colds and upper respiratory infections after competition and intense training. Free radical damage to cellular DNA plays a significant role in the evolution of certain cancers, heart disease and neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease.

Exercise and Oxidative Damage

Endurance exercise can increase oxygen utilization from 10 to 20 times over the resting state and up to 100 to 200 times in working muscles. This greatly increases the generation of free radicals via oxidative metabolism in skeletal mitochondria. Fortunately, the body has an elaborate antioxidant defense system that utilizes dietary intake of antioxidant vitamins and minerals as well as our body’s own enzyme systems to decrease concentrations of the most harmful oxidants in tissues. Regular endurance training has been shown to enhance our internal antioxidant defense system, these changes of which occur slowly over time and appear to parallel other adaptations to exercise. When free radical production exceeds the ability of antioxidant enzymes and nutritionally obtained antioxidants to neutralize them, oxidative stress results. So, what can we as endurance athletes do to minimize the damage caused by the inevitable overflow of free radicals during training and competition?

Fruits and Vegetables: The Power of the Pyramid!

A recent change in dietary intake of fruits and vegetables by the USDA has placed a greater emphasis on increasing our daily consumption from the previous 5-7 servings a day to 7-9 servings and up to 13 servings or more for endurance athletes! Vitamins C, E, and beta carotene are the primary vitamin antioxidants. Previous research looking into the effects of supplementing our diets with these isolated nutrients has yielded equivocal results. Once thought to be beneficial to cardiac health, isolated vitamin E supplementation has now been questioned. Beta carotene supplements have been shown to increase lung cancer in smokers as well as contribute to thickening of the lining of arteries. Recent studies now point to the synergistic role of numerous antioxidants obtained from the consumption of whole foods such as fruits and vegetables. Therefore, a diet rich in naturally occurring antioxidants appears to outweigh the risks inherent to supplementing one’s diet with isolated laboratory made supplements. Furthermore, various key trace minerals such as zinc, selenium and manganese found in naturally occurring foods are needed for the proper functioning of various endogenous antioxidant enzymes.

Training Right, Eating Right:  Final Thoughts

The endurance athlete faces a challenge of balancing daily aerobic exercise with preventative measures that minimize the damaging affects of oxidative stress.  Clearly, fruits and vegetables rich in antioxidants are vital to this balance. Many of us may find it difficult to consume the recommended amounts of fruits and vegetables to achieve this balance. For those who are unable to take in enough daily produce, cryoevaporated fruits and vegetables in capsule form, such as Juice Plus+, make it possible to supplement what we are not able to consume when we visit the salad bar. Antioxidant supplementation helps to bridge the gap between what we eat on a daily basis (what we know we should be eating!) and the optimal amount of phytonutrients needed to combat the damaging effects of oxidative stress. As endurance athletes, it is important to be aware of not only the benefits of aerobic exercise but the potentially negative aspects training and racing can have on our bodies and long term health. Finding a healthy balance between training and proper nutrition will go a long way in promoting longevity in any endurance athletic activity. David-PhillipsDavid Phillips, M.D. graduated in 1984 from Harvard University where he earned academic honors and was an All-American swimmer.  He received his medical degree from Wright State University School of Medicine in Dayton, Ohio.  After practicing as an emergency room physician, Dr. Phillips shifted his focus to sports medicine.  He has competed individually in national and international triathlons including the 2005 Ford Ironman World Championships, and qualified as a member of Team USA at the 2008 International Triathlon Union World Championships in Vancouver.      

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Glutathione – Understanding a Whole Food Diet

antioxidant-004

What the heck is Glutathione?

(gloota-thigh-own) Glutathione is a POWERFUL antioxidant. Why haven't you heard about it. Because it's not jazzy sounding like some. Not behind some product. Lots more could be said here, but we will skip for another day. We hear the word antioxidant ALL THE TIME. We throw that term around like we really understand it. But do we? If we did, I bet we'd try to get more of them. And hear this. Not all antioxidants are created equal. If you're breathing right now, moving your eyes to read, holding your breath... blinking, WHATEVER, you have the process going on in your body. Metabolism. Fact of life. We like to breathe, so the process is a great thing. But just like we like our cars, because walking to Starbucks everyday would not be all that pleasant, there are downsides to this process of living and breathing. Think of your car. You put gas in, the engine burns the gas for fuel, things go zoom to starbucks...but we totally forget the negative stuff, because in our car, unless your muffler goes out, you don't know that the exhaust of the engine burning fuel is a fact of life. We don't see it. It's behind us. Unless we are sitting behind the city bus, waiting for it to move the heck out of the way so we could get to starbucks. antioxidant-002Ok. So back to the body. You blink, press the gas pedal, your body needs fuel to do that. Zoom. Inside you, the process's exhaust is called a free radical. And he's just plain crazy. Actually, a free radical is an unstable oxygen molecule, missing an electron. And left unchecked, causes lots of problems. What the free radical does is take an electron from whatever neighbor happens to be walkhing by, and GUESS WHAT, turns that perfectly innocent, and maybe functionally totally fine cell into a free radical itself. SEE?????? So think of on down the road...some dirt in the tank is ok. Fuel filter takes care. A bit more...replace the fuel filter...but there is wear and tear. And eventually...So maybe you get the picture. What it's really called is oxidative stress. Forward thinking doctors will say that this is the foundation of just about all disease and sickness. So whats a person to do? Stop breathing? Stop blinking? antioxidant-0011Introduce A N T I O X I D A N T. Simply put, this wonderful thing of nature, The Antioxidant, neutralizes the free radical. The antioxidant has an electron to donate without going crazy itself. And PRESTO. All is well in love and war. The key with antioxidants. You really don't know when you'll be behind the bus...literally breathing in toxins (free radicals and who knows what else), do your body needs to have lots of antioxidants on hand. IN the bloodstream. In the body. So...for more information, for those you like this kind of stuff, "G" or glutathione, is a triple threat to toxins. It neutralizes free radicals, enhances the immune system and detoxifies the liver. And here's a kicker, even if you're doing everything right, just by aging, antioxidants like G start to slip. The levels just go down. So, what about this one. There are literally thousands of antioxidants. What's so special about this one. Well, its found in every cell of the body, protecting the cell's engine from bacteria, viruses and toxins. Did you know that antioxidants have a very short life span. Once they neutralize a free radical. Bye bye birdie. HOWEVER!!! G has enough zip to revitalize spent antioxidants like C and E, and recharging itself as well. SUPERMAN!!!! So where does this G come from. Amino acids, particularly in foods such as asparagus, spinach, avocado and squash. Your body takes the plant version can CONVERTS it to replenish the body's supply. antioxidant-003So your body's primary detox organ is the liver. Ever thought about that? The liver is seriously important. Though aren't they all. Check out the blog on the facial smoothie. What a clear face. Detox the liver because if the liver is not working all that great, those toxins gooooooo...ON THE SKIN, ON THE FACE. Waste products/toxins on the face is what that is really saying. A whole slew of skin things can be cleared up by loving on the liver. What the liver does is determine if an item is a nutrient to be absorb or gotten rid of. And when there isn't enough G around, there's a traffic jam. Toxins pile up, and they got to go somewhere. G owes much of it's fame to a sulfur-rich amino acid found in eggs, garlic and whey protein. Broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage help to restock the body's G supply. Green tea, fish oil and resveratrol also aid in making G. And CHECK THIS OUT, aerobic exercise and yoga boost G levels as well. So understand, your body makes this. Or converts it from plant form. No simple pill. So a more whole food diet is needed. And less stress, less toxins. Here is a list of foods. And know that if you eat more fruits and veggies, your body will rely less on G, and thus you'll have a stock pile, for when you're sitting behind the bus, your body is equipped to deal. Or if you boss really lays it on you. Or you go run a 26 mile race.  :)  Nourish the body, so when stress comes, it's LESS STRESSFUL. G- foods: asparagus, spinach, avocado, squash, melons, grapefruit - EATEN RAW Building Blocks for G: eggs, garlic, whey protein (bio active and undenatured or nondenatured proteins).

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Power Food, A Green Smoothie for a Vibrant Face, kick sugar, detox liver

Your Face - Your Health meets the Green Smoothie

Everyone would love love love to have the Vogue model's skin. Did you know that your skin is a direct reflection of your health status. Your skin and your mouth. Interesting. Toxins and what not, not filtered by the filtration systems in the body try to come out the skin. And sometimes get stuck. Acne. Eczema. Etc. And winkles. Wrinkles are not just caused by the sun. Free radicals, a natural bio-product of living and breathing and blinking and all the other mundane stuff that we do; those bad boys hurt our skin cells and cause wrinkles. And a whole plethora of other things that generally cause us to be ill, unhappy and die. What about those brown spots on your skin. Age spots. Those aren't just a normal thing to happen to the skin, but an indication that perhaps your liver isn't filtering out all the toxins and the body and needing to put it somewhere, puts the toxins in the skin. OUCH! All of this information is from a great book, Do You Have the Guts to Be Beautiful. Written by Jennifer Daniels, MD and Mitra Ray, PH.D. Check them out at www.fromheretolongevity.com. Wonderful stuff. It's simple stuff that they suggest, down to earth, holistic and generally very accessible for all. So lets chat about this green smoothie. YUM YUM YUM. My experience with it is that it has taken away my sugar cravings. And that's a MIRACLE. It will do a ton of good things for you. Get rid of wrinkles, age spots and sags under the eyes. The kale that you use in the smoothie is one of the most nutrient dense veggies around and we generally only find it on our plate as a garnish at the restaurants. And we probably don't eat it. It's great great great for you. And in the smoothie, you won't taste it. 2 out of three of my kids will DOWN the smoothie. Ha ha ha. Mom wins one!!! Or I could probably call that two or three with all the nutrition in it. Not to mention how healthy flax seed is for you. Fiber and a natural source of omega-3.  Good stuff for the heart. Freshly ground is best, from the bag is better than nothing. More from the book, because it's so very interesting. Get a mirror and see what you see. [tie_list type="checklist"]
  • Horizontal Lines above eyebrows - waster accumulation in your intestines
  • Vertical lines between eyebrows - liver is not removing poisons
  • Bags under the eyes - Eating bread, sugars, processed juices, pastas
  • Blue circles under eyes - Bread and diary
  • Big ears/ nose getting a bulb with age - hormones in animal products
[/tie_list] And the list goes on. Check the book out. Or look for one of our Facial/Smoothie parties.  Fascinating.

Back to the smoothie

[amd-zlrecipe-recipe:22]

Kale: A Power Food

Kale is absolutely rich and abundant in calcium, lutein, iron, and Vitamins A, C, and K. Kale has seven times the beta-carotene of broccoli and ten times more lutein. Kale is rich in Vitamin C not to mention the much needed fiber in the daily diet. The "Icing on the Kale" are the natural occurring all important phytochemicals sulforaphane and indoles which research suggests may protect against cancer. Let's not forget the all important antioxidant Vitamin E. The naturally rich sulfur content of kale deserves a bit more discussion. Science has discovered that sulforaphane, helps boost the body's detoxification enzymes, possibly by altering gene expression. This is turn is purported to help clear carcinogenic substances in a timely manner. Sulforaphane is formed when cruciferous vegetables like kale are chopped or chewed. This somehow triggers the liver to produce enzymes that detoxify cancer causing chemicals, of which we all are exposed on daily basis. A recently new study in the Journal of Nutrition (2004) demonstrates that sulforaphane helps stop breast cancer cell proliferation. So, check this thought out!!! There is a SUPER easy way to get your kids to eat kale. Fantastic! Don't worry about working too hard on this smoothly. I start with putting some water or good juice in, or a bit of both, turning on the blender and then start adding stuff in while it's running. Of course I tend to make a big mess so...Point is, just rinse off the kale and then rip off the leafy parts off the big thick stalk. When you leave the blender running long enough, it gets chopped up just fine. IMG_1620You can play around with what you put in for liquid. Plain water, 1/2 juice. Maybe think about something with less sugar. For the kids, you might be more successful when you add some juice. Motts Light Apple Juice is a great choice.

Flax seed: Another Power Food

Although flaxseed contains all sorts of healthy components, it owes its healthy reputation primarily to three ingredients: [tie_list type="starlist"]
  • Omega-3 essential fatty acids, "good" fats that have been shown to have heart-healthy effects. Each tablespoon of ground flaxseed contains about 1.8 grams of plant omega-3s.
  • Lignans, which have both plant estrogen and antioxidant qualities. Flaxseed contains 75- 800 times more lignans than other plant foods
  • Fiber. Flaxseed contains both the soluble and insoluble types.
[/tie_list] IMG_1622Recent studies have suggested that flaxseed may have a protective effect against cancer, particularly breast cancer, prostate cancer, and colon cancer. At least two of the components in flaxseed seem to contribute, says Kelley C. Fitzpatrick, M.Sc., director of health and nutrition with the Flax Council of Canada.  In animal studies, the plant omega-3 fatty acid found in flaxseed, called ALA, inhibited tumor incidence and growth.  Further, the lignans in flaxseed may provide some protection against cancers that are sensitive to hormones. Some studies have suggested that exposure to lignans during adolescence helps reduce the risk of breast cancer, Thompson says. Lignans may help protect against cancer by: [tie_list type="checklist"]
  • Blocking enzymes that are involved in hormone metabolism.
  • Interfering with the growth and spread of tumor cells.
[/tie_list] IMG_1623Some of the other components in flaxseed also have antioxidant properties, which may contribute to protection against cancer and heart disease. Concerning getting the flax seed into the smoothie. I bought a cheap walmart coffee bean grinder for a $10 bill and that's all that I use it for. You can get flaxseed very cheaply at Whole Foods or Green Acres out of the bins, put it in a plastic pour container and presto, ready to go. Flaxseed is nutritionally best when freshly ground, so take a minute, pour some in the grinder, squeeze, release, squeeze, release, turn the grinder upside down, tap tap tap and pour into blender. milk-thistleMilk Thistle: DON'T SKIP. Powder, pill or liquid. I like the liquid. Perhaps the most important milk thistle benefits are its effects on the liver. The liver is one of the most important organs in the body, breaking down nutrients and cleaning the body out. Milk thistle detoxifies the liver as well as protects it against damage from toxins, alcohol and other negative effects. Milk thistle benefits the liver in other ways as well: it promotes regeneration and repair of liver cells, reverses liver damage and is very helpful in the treatment of hepatitis and cirrhosis. Some milk thistle clinical trials show that milk thistle benefits may include reducing inflammation, decreasing excessive skin cell growth and helping treat endometriosis. You can buy milk thistle from whole foods or amazon. IMG_1624Today I'm in need of more fiber, iron and protein, so I'm adding in the most awesome meal/powder stuff around. Totally my opinion. The stuff has nice blend of plant protein, not just soy and an assortment of yummy stuff like wheat grass and spirulina...the list goes on and on. And NO ADDED SUGAR. So for a blender, which is generally two servings, I add a scope or two, depending on if you want a full serving a goodness or not. Two scopes might make it a bit powdery in texture though. More information on this product can be found on the nutrition link of this website. Or you can connect with me. Ok. Here is the ONLY RULE for making this smoothie. HAVE FUN WITH IT. If you don't like the taste at first, 1/2 the kale. You might ask what a "fleshy fruit" is. When in doubt, just add something in there. Frozen mix is great. Then you don't need ice if you like your smoothies cold. Pineapple, mango, strawberries are all great choices.  Experiment. Worst thing that can happen is you either pucker when you drink it or you throw it out for the dogs. No biggie. Have fun. Have your kids help you. Do it everyday. If you try and like, leave a comment on my blog. Or share what you really like in your smoothie. Just another thought...what you eat can have a big big big impact on your face. Think about this, there are a ton of people when they eat chocolate, they break out. So the reverse logic...it's totally true. And know that when your skin becomes more vibrant, it's reflecting a body that is more healthy, inside to out!!! Happy drinking! green-smoothie-3

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