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Balsamic Roasted Clafouti

Hey, since it's getting warmer out I thought maybe we'd try some fruit recipes! And who doesn't love a good dessert right?? Clafouti is a french dessert, similar to a flan and you add fruit to it. Super yummy and awesome on a summer evening! I used strawberries but you can use any berries. I've even used peaches and it was delicious. Some people dust this with powdered sugar before cutting, it is good either way. I just prefer to add the least amount of sugar possible. Happy baking!!

1 lb strawberries, trimmed and quartered (or fruit of choice)

1/3 cup plus 1 Tbsp maple sugar, divided (you can also use regular sugar or coconut if you have trouble finding maple sugar)

1 Tbsp balsamic vinegar

Cooking spray

3 large eggs

1 cup milk of choice

1/2 cup whole wheat flour (I had white whole wheat and used that)

1 tsp. vanilla

1/4 tsp. sea salt

2 Tbsp unsalted butter or ghee, melted

  1. Heat oven to 350. Place half of the fruit in an 8 x 8 baking dish. Stir in 1 Tbsp sugar and vinegar. Roast about 10 minutes, you want them soft but not mushy.
  2. Over a medium bowl strain the berries, saving the juice for later.
  3. Spray a 9 inch pie plate with cooking spray. In a blender mix eggs, milk, remaining 1/3 cup sugar, flour, vanilla and salt. Blend on high 30 seconds. Add melted butter and blend another minute. Pour into pie plate, top with roasted strawberries. Bake until the edges are golden and center is set but slightly jiggly, about 30 minutes. Trust me, you'll know what I mean by jiggly but set. It makes sense when you see it.
  4. Cool 10 minutes. Cut into wedges and top with fresh fruit.

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Homemade Granola

It's no secret I love to meal prep. I also freaking LOVE granola! So I try to keep this on hand because it holds up for a long time in an airtight container, and I've also vacuum sealed it and put it in the freezer. It doesn't usually last long though because I tend to take it everywhere!

I have a store by me called Fresh Thyme, they are amazing and they have a peanut grinder so you can grind your own fresh. It's super convenient and fun for the kids to do lol!

Also, this recipe is really flexible. Omit coconut if you don't like it. Feeling nutty? Add peanuts, almonds or cashews. If chocolate isn't your thing *gasp* then omit that too.

2 1/2 cups rolled oats (I prefer to not use the instant but it's up to you)

1/4 cup honey

1/4 cup butter or ghee

1/4 cup brown sugar (you can use coconut sugar too)

1/2 cup natural peanut butter

Dark chocolate chips, as many as you like

1/4 cup sunflower seeds

1/4 cup coconut flakes

1 tsp vanilla

1/4 tsp salt

  1. Heat oven to 350.
  2. Line a 9 inch baking dish with parchment or foil and spray with cooking spray. I use olive oil spray but use whatever you have.
  3. Place your oats and nuts, if using, on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Bake for 8-10 minutes, until toasted.
  4. Add honey, butter and brown sugar to a sauce pan and cook over medium heat until the sugar dissolves. Remove from heat and stir in vanilla and salt.
  5. Add the honey mixture to the oats and stir well. Add all other ingredients except chocolate and stir, the idea is to make sure there aren't any dry spots.
  6. If you are adding chocolate, wait about 10 minutes before adding so it doesn't just melt.
  7. Spread into your prepared pan and press down on it firmly. You can use a rubber spatula, your hand, the bottom of a cup. You just want to make it as dense as possible.
  8. Chill for 2 hours and cut into bars.

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Tahini Cookies

Healthy cookies? YES PLEASE! These cookies are yummy and are gluten free/dairy free. Ya gotta try them! I add more or less chocolate depending on how my cravings are.

1/2 C tahini

1/2 C maple syrup

1 tsp vanilla

1 egg

1 C oats

1 C almond flour

1/2 tsp baking soda

1/2 tsp sea salt

1/2-3/4 C dark chocolate chips

  1. Heat oven to 350. Line baking sheets with parchment paper.
  2. Add tahini, syrup and vanilla to a food process and process until well combined.
  3. Add egg and blend, then add oats, flour, salt and baking soda. Pulse until the oats are broken up, then stir in chocolate chips.
  4. Drop batter by the tablespoon and bake 12-14 minutes.

Cool completely, then store in an airtight container. I've also frozen these and they hold up well. It makes roughly 2 dozen cookies.

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Geeky Inflammation Info: SPMs

Inflammation is an underlying cause of chronic disease, we now also know that if left unaddressed, inflammation cannot resolve itself and progression of chronic disease may in fact be accelerated. Recent studies have revealed when patients are deficient in their ability to resolve inflammation, there is a progression in chronic disease states – this deficiency has been described in an increasing number of chronic disease states including obesity or metabolic syndrome, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, mild cognitive impairment, compromised digestive function (e.g., IBS, IBD, SIBO etc.), certain autoimmune conditions, Lyme disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, arthritis (rheumatoid and osteoarthritic), and a variety of other chronic conditions often complicated by chronic pain.  Read more at Metagenics Institute

FACT: Inflammation is an immune response to insults such as injuries (e.g., cuts and wounds), infections (e.g., bacterial, viral or fungal), or unhealthy dietary patterns. Although an inflammatory response is an essential, protective response, it can give rise to chronic inflammation if left unresolved.

FACT: The Body makes SPMs during the inflammation process: During the resolution phase of an inflammatory response, SPMs are biosynthesized (through multiple steps of enzymatic reactions) from long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and especially omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA.2,3 SPMs themselves are structurally different from omega-3 fatty acids.

FACT: SPMs do not inhibit the initiation phase of inflammation. Rather, SPMs help facilitate the clearance of inflammatory components and thus resolve the inflammatory response.

SPMs limit the immune response.

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Maximize Nutrition with Proteins

Protein is a powerhouse of a macro nutritions

  • Helps to create muscles, organs, nails and hair
  • Helps your cells to communicate
  • Facilitates muscle contraction
  • Transmission of nerve signals
  • Protein makes up
    • Immune molecules
    • Blood cells
    • Hormones, Enzymes and new protein cells
Protein is made up of chains of amino acids and each protein has its own unique combination of amino acids.  This explains how proteins serve such a vast role in the body and emphasizes why it is CRITICAL that you get your protein from a variety of sources, as each offers something unique.  The body needs all of these things.

Amino acids are broken down to build tissue, signal metabolism and a plethora of other processes.

Fyi.  Your DNA (again, everyone is different ... ) tells the body how to create the right proteins for nearly EVERY PROCESS in the body that occurs.  In order for the body to accomplish what the DNA is "programmed" to do, there much be plenty of amino acids available.  Even missing just ONE amino acid will stop a protein from doing it's job.

There are 20 amino acids.

Many of the 20 amnio acids can be synthesized in the body.  There are eight amino acids that you are unable to make.  We must get them from our food, thus they are called the essential amino acids.  Fact: animal proteins contain all eight of these amino acids.  There are also several complete plant proteins, but not all of these proteins are available in these  non-animal foods.  The human body is not designed to absorb them.  This might lead to plant based protein eaters not getting all of what they need and leading to deficiencies if they are not aware of this fact and supplementing accordingly. FYI.  New studies are showing that it is not the "red meat" that is causing all the issues (cancer and heart disease), but the fat composition of the red meat.  So again, the quality of the meat can make a huge difference.  As with all things in the food chain, red meat serves a purpose and is beneficial if consumed correctly and cleanly.  Grass-fed happy cows and that are "handled well" would be a great example of a source of red meat that is "clean" and of high quality.

High quality protein

  • grass-fed beef
  • pasture raised eggs
  • wild-caught salmon
  • organic vegetables

Protein is an essential structural component of all hormones.

  1.  Protein is digested
  2. Insulin acts as a gas pedal
  3. Glucagon acts as the break
  4. Protein doesn't have much sugar in it so ... a lot of protein without "sugar" causes hypoglycemia (blood sugar drops)
  5. To slow insulin down, arginine (amino acid from protein), tells insulin to stop stealing all the glucose out of the bloodstream
  6. For those with insulin resistance, one meal a day with only protein helps to keep the blood sugar from swinging so much

How Much Protein Do You Need

Low Protein Diet (less than 50 grams a day)
  • Decreases prolactin, growth hormone, estrogen, thyroid hormones, and insulin
  • Stimulates the stress response
  • Increases body fat and fatty liver
High Protein Diet
  • Can be damaging to the kidneys
  • Increase in body fat
  • NON ATHLETES: more than one gram of protein per kilogram of body weight
Protein consumption might need to be unique per individual depending on the particular imbalances going on, such as being anemic. There are a lot of plant proteins that vary in amino acid composition and bioavailability.  This means how much protein the body is actually able to be digested and processed in the human body.  Please recognize that ALL proteins, plants as well ... are a food source for all animals.  Thus, in common sense terms, different plants and animals are designed to "feed" different animals more efficiently.  This is how mother nature works.  Just because we can pick it and eat it doesn't mean that we were designed to digest and utilize the plant nutrients.

Best Plant Proteins:  Complete and Highly Bioavailable

  • Spirulina
  • Hemp
  • Soy
  • Quinoa
  • Lentils
  • Buckwheat
  • Amaranth
Other plant proteins, while they aren't complete, when added to the above listed help to increase protein completeness and value.
  • Brown rice
  • Peas
  • Beans
  • Chickpeas
  • Tahini

It is not necessary to eat a complete protein at every meal, to work to ensure that you get all the amino acids (a variety of protein including a completely protein) every day.

Plant proteins ... the benefits

  • Provide a host of phytochemicals or plant nutrients = biologically beneficial compounds found in plants.
  • The deep colors
    • Bioflavonoids:  anti-oxidants that protect the body against stress
      • citrus, onions, tea, parlsey, wine, soy, and dark chocolate.
    • Isothiocyanate:  sulfur containing nutrients help fight cancer and combat stress in the body.
      • cruciferous vegetables:  broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, brussels sprouts, and kale
    • Carotenoids:  Yellow and orange pigments that act as precursors to vitamin A such as beta-carotene and lycopene.  They may play a role in preventing some cancers.
      • Carrots, sweet potatoes, and tomatoes
    • Anthocyanins: Blue and purple pigments that are a form of flavonoid.  They scavenge free radicals and acts as antioxidants, helping to reduce stress in the body.  They may play a role in preventing heart disease.
      • Blueberries, edlerberries, blackberries, purple and red grapes
    • Polyphenols:  Flavonoid which prevent cancer cells from creating new blood vessels, reducing stress, protecting from ultraviolet radiation, reducing inflammation, and p rotecting the heart.
      • Tea, cinnamon, coffee and many fruits and vegetables
    • Chlorophyll:  green pigment found in all plants. Component in vitamin A, C, E, and K as well as magnesium, iron, potassium, calcium and fatty acids. This nutrient also helps to repair DNA and keep it from mutating, which may help to prevent cancer.
    • Phytosterols:  may help block uptake of dietary cholesterol
      • Wheat germ, rice bran, sesame oil, whole grains, nuts and legumes.
    • Lignans:  phytoestrogens found in seeds and plants.  They may decrease levels of testosterone but have been shown to be beneficial in keeping blood sugars more stable (diabetes). Also have been shown to improve fatty liver.  Lignans can interrupt the circulation of estrogen in the GI tract in two ways, as a dietary fiber that binds to estrogens and as a compound that affects the composition of intestinal bacteria, reducing enzyme activity which lowers levels of free estrogen.  Dietary fiber also increases the concentration of globulin in the blood which binds to sex hormones and reduces the levels of free estradiol (rendering them inactive).  This can help with females that are estrogen dominant.
      • Flaxseed
      • Males with low testosterone will want to avoid
      • Women with polycystic ovarian syndrome might benefit

Plant proteins ... the down side

Plant protein comes packaged with carbohydrates.  (Animal protein comes packaged with fat.)

Too many carbohydrates in the diet can contribute to inflammation and blood sugar imbalance.

Plants are not defenseless.  They are designed to prevent creatures from feasting on them.  These compounds are known as antinutrients.  These antinutrients can keep us from absorbing all the nutrients in the plants and can cause side effects for people that are sensitive to them or have hormonal imbalances.
  • Phytate or phytic acid: primary storage compound of phosphorous in plants.  It is known to bind minerals in the GI tract Grains, keeping them from being absorbed.   This can lower iron, zinc, calcium, and magnesium levels.  It can also make it harder to digest proteins and fats by inhibiting digestive enzymes.  Phytic acid also has some benefits such as scavenging heavy metals.  Also, phytic acid slows digestion down so it may help balance blood sugar levels.
    • The highest sources of phytic acid is from beans, soy, sesame and rapeseed oils.
  • Oxalate or Oxalic Acid: Can bind with calcium and other minerals making them insoluble and decreasing their bioavailability. Consumption of high oxalate foods my cause decreased bone growth, kidney stones, renal toxicity, diarrhea, and impaired blood clotting.
    • Rhubard, tea, spinach, and parsley (asparagus, broccoli, brussels sprouts, collards, lettuce, celery, cabbage, cauliflower, peas, coffee, beets, etc.  It
  • Goitrogens:   Make it harder for the thyroid to absorb iodine because the compete with iodine for entry into the gland.  They also weaken the activity of the enzyme thyroid peroxidase which is required for conversion of T4 and T3.  However, in common sense terms, you would have to eat TWO POUNDS of kale in order to have an impact on your thyroid.  For those with thyroid issues, the vegetables to avoid are raw brussels sprouts and collard greens.   Cooking decreases the affect.
    • Cabbage, brussels sprouts, kale, broccoli
  • Lectins: present in high levels in legumes.  Lectins are able to bind or clump together red blood cells, which can cause blood clots in coronary arteries, blood vessels to the lungs and smaller blood vessels in the GI tract.  They can also interfere with nutrient absorption from the intestine.  And they may encourage bacteria overgrowth in the GI tract.
    • Black beans, soybeans, lima beans, etc and grain products
  • Glycoalkaloid: antinutrient produced by the nightshades.  For people that are sensitive to nightshades, consumption of these foods can cause depression, anxiety, indigestion, joint pain, and anemia.
    • Potato, tomato, peppers, eggplant, tobacco, and goji berry.  Potatoes are the highest producers.
  • Heavy metals:  found the soil that plants are grown in.  They have no biological function and highly toxic.  Heavy metal build up have been linked to breast, endometrial cancer, endometriosis, and spontaneous abortion, preterm deliveries and still births, and low birth weight.
    • Arsenic, lead, mercury, and cadmium
    • Aluminum has been shown to damage nerve tissue and may contribute to Alzheimer's.
  • Soy:  90% of soy is genetically modified. Soy is hard to digest because it has trypsin inhibitors which inhibit digestive enzymes. Fermentation helps with the digestion but not completely.  This is why miso and tempeh are recommended over others like tofu.  Phytoestrogens (from soy) have been implicated in infertility, testosterone deficiency, and thyroid suppression.  Soy in baby formula may contribute to early puberty, asthma, thyroid disease, and food allergies, and behavioral problems.  Some processes required to package soy protein requires using acid washing in aluminum tanks in order to remove the antinutrients.  This leaches aluminum into the product.
Antinutrients can be decreased by soaking, fermenting, heating, sprouting, and milling or grinding.  Soy is very resistant to many of these methods. With balanced protein consumption from the plant world, adequate protein can be consumed, though supplements can be helpful.   Sources: 1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27459444 2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22412075 3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19307518 4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15927927 5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22470009 6. http://www.nature.com/articles/srep25145 7. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9605218 8. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4264239/ 9. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23553645 10. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12083319 11. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12016126 12. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15113961 11. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12016126 12. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15113961 13. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11916349 14. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11142531 15. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24460407 16. http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0001148 17. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ptr.5635/full 18. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11445478 19. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.3109/09637486.2016.1161011 20. http://lifestyleworksclinic.com/Estrogen%20Metab%20ANSR%20Research.pdf 21. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2266880/ 22. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3153292/ 23. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26946249 24. http://het.sagepub.com/content/5/1/15.short 25. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26094520 26. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27479193 27. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12639286 28. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21325465 29. Van Wyck JJ and other. The Effects Of A Soybean Product On Thyroid Function In Humans. Pediatrics, 24, 752-60 30. Poley JR and Klein AW. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 1983 May;2(2):271-87 31. Freni-Titulaer LW and others. Am J Dis Child 1986 Dec;140(12):1263-1267  

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#61 The All Day Energy Diet with Yuri Elkaim

[podcast src="https://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/5629708/height/90/width/480/theme/custom/autonext/no/thumbnail/yes/autoplay/no/preload/no/no_addthis/no/direction/forward/render-playlist/no/custom-color/88AA3C/" height="90" width="480"]   Coach BK and Yuri Elkaim chat about how important nutrition and  health eating is, especially when considering endurance athletes and female health.

Yuri Elkaim is a health and fitness expert, "energy nutritionist", and author of The All-Day Energy Diet. He wrote this book for himself - he battled for 20 years with crippling health issues, which included extreme fatigue - as well as millions of everyday people for whom low energy is robbing their lives.

Now, serving over 250,000 people on a daily basis via email and with over 15 million Youtube videos watched, Yuri is most famous for helping people enjoy all-day energy and amazing health in a very short period of time without radical diets or gimmicks.

He holds a bachelor’s degree in Physical Education and Health from the University of Toronto and is a Registered Holistic Nutritionist. Yuri is also a former pro soccer player and served as the strength & conditioning and nutrition coach at the University of Toronto for 7 years. He's on a mission to transform the lives of more than 10 million people by 2018. For more visit:

http://www.yurielkaim.com

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Health Benefits of Garlic

GARLIC Garlic is probably the best researched and most commonly used herb in the world.  Native to Central Asia, garlic is now used in most every country's ciusine. Mention of garlic can be found in the ancient medical tests of Egypt, India, China, Greece and Rome, some dating as far back as 5,000 years.  This world-renowned cure-all herb has been touted for everything from weight loss and infections to low energy, dysentery, snake bites and low libido (1).  A search through the research literature of todays yields over 4,000 citations on garlic, suggesting it is just as popular in modern times as it was in ancient times. Much of the research on garlic has focused on the organosulfur compounds, or OSCs, found in the whole clove, which are responsible for its flavor and distinct smell.  While allicin is probably the best recognized of the OSCs, there are actually many different types of OSCs found in garlic.  Some of these compounds, like allicin are dependent of enzymes that are activated when garlic is crushed, chopped, or chewed.  Others, like those found in aged garlic supplements, are formed during the aging process or are formed as breakdown product of other OSCs (2).  These OSCs are believed to be responsible for the majority of the health benefits of garlic though polyphenolic compounds and prebiotic fibers in garlic may also contribute to its health benefits. CARDIOVASCULAR BENEFITS Probably the best researched and most celebrated benefit of garlic is its ability to benefit the cardiovascular system.  Indeed, garlic has long been used for conditions that affect the cardiovascular system.  Research studies show that garlic supplements are quite ueful for the treatment of uncontrolled  hypertension, lowering blood pressure by about 10 mmHg systolic and 8mmHg diastolic, similar to standard blood pressure medications. (3)  Mechanisms by which garlic reduces blood pressure include inhibiting the aggregation of platelets, thus keeping the blood flowing smoothly (4), relaxing the blood vessels, and even blocking production of hormones that cause blood pressure to increase (5).  Garlic may also benefit the cardiovascular system by reducing LDL cholesterol levels and modulating inflammation (6).   ANTIMICROBIAL and ANTIVIRAL As far back as 1858, Louis Pasteur carried out experiments to confirm the historically recognized bacteria-fighting activity of garlic (7).  Today garlic is recognized for its ability to fight not only bacteria, but also fungi, viruses and parasites (8).  The OSCs in garlic appear especially beneficial for limiting the growth and even killing H. pylori, a microbe that commonly infects the stomach and causes ulcers (9).  Research into the effects of garlic on the immune system show that it can increase the responsiveness of several important antiviral immune cells such as Natural Killer cells and specialized gamma delta T cells (10).  Ultimately the increase in immune cell function has been related to fewer symptoms and reduced severity of cold flu as well as less time missed from work (11).  Beside fighting microbes directly, garlic may serve as a prebiotic, helping to strengthen the good bacteria so they are better able to fight off infectious agents in the first place (12).  Garlic also reduces the inflammatory compounds that certain microbes produce (13).   DETOXIFICATION Although much more research is needed to fully understand this connection, the OSCs in garlic are believed to support the body's detoxification processes.  First, OSCs  support the detoxification process, helping the body to neutralize and eliminate carcinogens and toxins.  Other studies indicate that garlic supplementation increases the liver's levels of glutathione and other important antioxidant enzymes involved in detoxification processes.  Furthermore, because many toxic compounds are eliminated from the body through the process knows as sulfation, by providing extra sulfur, garlic helps provide substrate to facilitate elimination of harmful compounds by the liver (14,15). BRAIN HEALTH The OSCs found in garlic display remarkably utility, benefiting not only the health of the body but also the health of the brain.  Some of the most interesting benefits of OSCs include their ability to increase growth of new nervous system tissue, protect the brain from beta-amyloid plaque induced inflammation and damage, and strengthen the blood-brain barrier (16,17).  Studies in an effective intervention-preventing inflammation from causing brain dysfunction (18).  Other studies show garlic increases the brains natural antioxidant defenses, helps with neurotransmitter signaling, and OSCs act as antioxidants themselves (19).  Overall, there exists a solid body of preclinical evidence suggesting garlic supplements have a promising future as prophylactic treatments for the development of neurodedegenerative conditions, such as Alzheimer's disease (20,21). OTHER BENEFITS Several of the OSCs found in garlic have been investigated for their ability to modulate inflammation (22,23).  Many of these studies have focused on garlic-related anti-inflammatory effects in the  gastrointestinal tract.  These studies suggest garlic modulates inflammatory reactions to pharmaceuticals, toxins, and pathogens in the gastrointestinal tract, making it applicable to a large portion of the population (22).  References available upon request.  

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The Real Super Foods

LETS THINK OLD SCHOOL

“Superfood” is a popular buzzword you’ve probably seen on health blogs, in grocery stores, and from well-meaning friends. It sort of scares us away because it seems that something is new and involved every time we turn around.   Whether the latest fad is a rare fruit from the Amazon or a seed that cures every disease known to man, most superfoods build on hype, not evidence of real health benefits.  HOWEVER ... your grandma had it right! Here are some foods that are MOST EXCELLENT FOR YOUR HEALTH.  And they are easy.  And cheap!

1. Garlic

Garlic has strong evidence to suggest it can improve circulatory health by facilitating blood flow, reducing blood pressure, and improving cholesterol levels. Garlic also provides antioxidant benefits because it supports the activity of glutathione, a powerful antioxidant. There is also evidence to suggest garlic consumption may ward off upper respiratory infections. It even has an anti-cancer effect. Including cloves of garlic in your diet is one of the healthiest habits you can have. What you really want to know, garlic can positively impact ...
  • Acne, especially the big ugly ones under the chin
  • Special issues in bikini area, like those ingrown things from biking!
  • Bacterial infections, in the groin area, on the butt, etc.

2. Dark berries

Dark berries, including blueberries, are a rich source of anthocyanins. Anthocyanins have antioxidant properties and can reduce DNA damage related to oxidation and stress. Older people can eat dark berries to improve memory. Though the mechanism behind this effect — increasing a growth factor called BDNF — could potentially work for young people as well, this has yet to be confirmed by dedicated studies. What you really want to know, dark berries can positively impact ...
  • Eye twitching brought about by stress, deficiency in a B vitamin
  • Cracks in the sides of your mouth, another deficiency in a different B vitamin
  • Immunity, happiness and cardiovascular health

3. Spirulina

Spirulina is a blue-green algae with a 55–70% protein content. It is safe to supplement and provides anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. Studies suggest that supplementing spirulina can increase bile acid blood levels, a characteristic of Gilbert’s Syndrome. People with Gilbert’s Syndrome are at lower risk for diabetes and obesity, as well as cardiovascular and neurological diseases. Animal research suggests spirulina may also be neuroprotective, but human studies are needed to confirm this effect. Unfortunately, spirulina is the worst-tasting supplement on this list.  

4. Leafy greens

Leafy green vegetables contain high levels of nitrate, as do beetroot. In fact, beetroot has so much nitrate that it can serve as a legitimate ergogenic aid and pre-workout supplement. Nitrates improve blood flow by dilating blood vessels. Eating nitrate-rich vegetables daily can help lower blood pressure over time. What you really want to know, dark greens can positively impact ...
  • Macular (eye) health
  • Clean up and nurture the liver and cardiovascular system
  • Provide iron and other plant nutrients that helps the body to deliver oxygen more efficiently, meaning better athletic performance.

YO!  Did you know that Juice Plus, the Orchard, Garden, Vineyard Blend along with the Complete Protein Powder  covers all of these!

 

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Healthy Avocado Brownies with Avo Frosting

Want a smart swap for a healthier dessert? You already know avocados are nutritional powerhouses, thanks to the fiber, B vitamins, folate, and potassium they provide. But did you know you can add the savory fruit, which is packed with healthy fats, to your sweet treats, too? Watch the video to learn how to make rich, fudgy brownies from your favorite superfood.

Ingredients

Brownies 3 oz. dark chocolate (70% cacao), chopped 1 Tbsp. coconut or extra-virgin olive oil 1/2 cup raw cacao powder or unsweetened cocoa (40g) 1/2 cup almond meal (60g) 1 tsp. baking powder 1/4 tsp. sea salt 2 ripe medium avocados (about 17 oz. total), halved, pitted, flesh scooped out 1/2 cup medjool dates (about 4.5 oz.), pitted 1/4 cup coconut sugar (1.4 oz.) 1 tsp. vanilla extract 2 large eggs Frosting 1 ripe medium avocado (about 9 oz.), halved, pitted, flesh scooped out 1/2 cup raw cacao powder or unsweetened cocoa (40g) 1/2 cup plus 1 Tbsp. maple syrup 2 tsp. vanilla extract Generous pinch of sea salt

Preparation

1. Preheat oven to 350ºF. Line an 8-inch square baking pan with foil; grease foil (with coconut oil, olive oil cooking spray or melted unsalted butter). Bring an inch of water to a simmer over low heat in a medium saucepan. Place chocolate and oil in a medium heatproof bowl. Set bowl over saucepan. Let stand, stirring occasionally, until melted and smooth. Remove bowl from heat and let cool until just warm to the touch. 2. In a small bowl, combine cacao, almond meal, baking powder and salt; stir until well mixed. 3. Place avocados, dates, coconut sugar and vanilla in a food processor; blend until smooth. Blend in eggs. Blend in cooled chocolate mixture. Scrape down sides of processor and mix again. Add almond meal mixture; pulse until blended. Spread mixture in baking pan and bake until just set, 30 to 35 minutes (do not overbake). Let cool on a rack. When cool, cover and refrigerate for at least 1 hour or up to overnight. 4. Just before serving, make frosting: Combine all ingredients in food processor and process until smooth and thick (you should have about 1¼ cups). Spread over chilled brownies (you may have some left over; cover and refrigerate for another use). Cut and serve. Store leftover brownies in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.

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Paleo 30 Day Challenge with Coach BK Lecture 1

[podcast src="https://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/4883519/height/90/width/480/theme/custom/autonext/no/thumbnail/yes/autoplay/no/preload/no/no_addthis/no/direction/forward/render-playlist/no/custom-color/88AA3C/" height="90" width="480"] www-bonniekissinger-com%2fpaleo Coach BK offers free athlete health assessments, which includes an online form to fill out and a 30 minute rockstar chat on the phone to go over the form results.  Coach BK will provide 3 action steps to help you get to the next level of your training.  START HERE >>> Athlete Health Assessment Form collage  

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