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Training Blocks

What is a training block? A training block is a period of focused training that hones in on a specific discipline. During these blocks, you back off on the volume and intensity of the other two disciplines to allow more time and energy to be spent on the third, which in this case is the bike. What are the benefits completing a training block? First, we need to talk briefly about the concept of progressive adaptation. In a nutshell, a stressor is applied in the form of a training session. This taxes the body systems which, in turn, respond by coming back a bit stronger than they were before (achieved with proper recovery!) so that they can better handle these stressors the next time around. Rinse and repeat. The tricky thing in multisport is that these stressors are spread across three sports and must be carefully balanced, and combined with appropriate bouts of rest and recovery, to avoid overtraining and injury. Throw life’s other demands into the mix and you’re left with a finite amount of stress you are able to apply within a given period. By scaling back the intensity and volume of two disciplines, you are subsequently able to scale up these factors in your third discipline. When executed in a strategic, smart manner, this can yield incredible fitness gains in a much shorter time than one would see utilizing their traditional approach. But won’t I lose fitness in other areas?! Nope! Your aerobic fitness will maintain, if not increase, throughout this training block. By strategically interspersing shorter, technique-based sessions of the other two disciplines each week, you will maintain neuromuscular sharpness in these areas without cutting into your primary focus area. So what now? As we wrap up race season and roll into the “off season”, this is the prime opportunity begin addressing our limiters in preparation for next year. Training blocks are an epic tool to doing so. So give it a shot! Switch things up, focus in and get ready to ROCK. We have developed a series of training blocks with various foci for the 2017-2018 off-season that are fully customizable to meet your training goals. The cycling block begins Monday, October 2. Sign up to get in on the fun!

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3 Feet PLEASE

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What a CYCLIST would say to a MOTORIST

It could be tragic. The pace of our lives. The results. How many of you have... 1. Texted while driving? 2. As a result of not paying attention, swerved across a line? 3. Reached down and took your eyes off the road? 4. Took a phone call, wasn't really paying attention? 5. Looked back at your kids and swerved a bit? It's EASY to do. The price might be CRAZY HIGH. Just something to think about.  Please WATCH and SHARE! [embed width="100%" height="auto"]http://www.youtube.com/embed/Euu2QRIuEPk[/embed]

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Share the Road Campaign, Cyclist + Motorists = Statistics

Cycling Accidents - August 2014

Every year in this country around 19,000 cyclists are injured in reported road accidents, including around 3,000 who are killed/seriously injured.

Cyclist Casualties, 20131

Child Adult All
Killed 6 103 109
Seriously Injured 276 2,867 3,143
Slightly Injured 1,676 14,510 16,186
Total 1,958 17,480 19,438
These figures only include cyclists killed or injured in road accidents that were reported to the police. Many cyclist casualties are not reported to the police, even when the cyclist is inured badly enough to be taken to hospital. The figures also exclude cycling accidents that occur away from the road. Although the number of deaths is accurate, there could be two or three times as many seriously injured cyclists and double the number of slightly injured. Cyclist casualties have risen in recent years as the amount of cycling has increased. The majority of cyclist casualties are adults, with less than one fifth being children. Cycling accidents increase as children grow older, with 10 to 15 year old riders being more at risk than other age groups, including adults until about the age of 60 years. To some extent, this reflects increased cycling as children grow older followed by a switch to motorised transport from the late teens onwards. It also co incides with the age when children attend Secondary school, and may indicate riskier behaviour by this age group. Males are far more likely to be involved in cycling accidents than females; four out of five cyclist casualties are male. Most cycling accidents happen in urban areas where most cycling takes place. Almost two thirds of cyclists killed or seriously injured were involved in collisions at, or near, a road junction, with T junctions being the most commonly involved. Roundabouts are particularly dangerous junctions for cyclists. Not surprisingly, the severity of injuries suffered by cyclists increases with the speed limit, meaning that riders are more likely to suffer serious or fatal injuries on higher speed roads. Almost half of cyclist deaths occur on rural roads. Around 80% of cycling accidents occur in daylight which is when most cycling takes place. For child cyclists, 90% of their accidents occur during the day. The most dangerous hours for cyclists are 3.00 to 6.00 p.m. and 8.00 to 9.00 a.m. on weekdays. However, cycling accidents in the dark are more likely to be fatal. More cycle accidents occur during the Spring and Summer months (May to September) than the Autumn and Winter months (October to April). However, the casualty rate in terms of miles travelled is higher over the Autumn and Winter period.

Cycling Accident

  • Around 75% of fatal or serious cyclist accidents occur in urban areas2
  • Around half of cyclist fatalities occur on rural roads
  • 75% happen at, or near, a road junction
  • 80% occur in daylight
  • 80% of cyclist casualties are male
  • Almost one quarter of the cyclists killed or injured are children
  • Around three quarters of cyclists killed have major head injuries.

Types of Accident

Accidents involving child cyclists are often the result of the child playing, doing tricks, riding too fast or losing control. For teenage and adult cyclists, accidents are more likely to involve collisions with motor vehicles, but about 16% of fatal or serious cyclist accidents reported to the police do not involve a collision with another vehicle, but are caused by the rider losing control of their bicycle. In collisions involving a bicycle and another vehicle, the most common key contributory factor recorded by the police is 'failed to look properly' by either the driver or rider, especially at junctions. 'Failed to look properly' was attributed to the car driver in 57% of serious collisions and to the cyclist in 43% of serious collisions at junctions. Other common contributory factors attributed to drivers are 'poor turn/manoeuvre' (in 17% of serious accidents involving a cyclist) and 'careless, reckless, in a hurry (17%). Cyclists are more likely to suffer serious injuries when a driver is judged to be 'impaired by alcohol', exceeding the speed limit' or 'travelling too fast for the conditions'. The second most common contributory factor attributed to cyclists was 'cyclist entering the road from the pavement' (including when a cyclist crosses the road at a pedestrian crossing), which was recorded in about 20% serious collisions (and over one third of serious collisions involving child cyclists). The most common vehicle involved in collisions with cyclists is a car or taxi, with the rider usually being hit by the front of the vehicle. In a quarter of fatal cyclist accidents, the front of the vehicle hit the rear of the bicycle. However, heavy goods vehicles (HGVs) present a particular danger for cyclists, especially in London where around 20% of cyclist fatalities occur involve an HGV. These often occur when an HGV is turning left at a junction'. About one quarter of accidents resulting in serious injury to a cyclist involved an HGV, bus or coach 'passing too close' to the rider.

Common Cycling Accidents

  • Motorist emerging into path of cyclist
  • Motorist turning across path of cyclist
  • Cyclist riding into the path of a motor vehicle, often riding off a pavement
  • Cyclist and motorist going straight ahead
  • Cyclist turning right from a major road and from a minor road
  • Child cyclist playing or riding too fast

Injury Patterns

Limb Injuries

Limb injuries are common in cyclist casualties, with over 40% suffering arm injuries and around 25% suffering leg injuries.

Chest/Abdomen Injuries

Chest and abdomen injuries occur much less frequently (5%), but are often serious. When they do occur they are often accompanied by head injuries.

Head Injuries

Head injuries, ranging from fatal skull fractures and brain damage to minor concussion and cuts, are very common injuries to cyclists. Hospital data shows that over 40% of cyclists, and 45% of child cyclists, suffer head injuries. A study of 116 fatal cyclist accidents in London and rural areas found over 70% of the cyclist fatalities in London had moderate or serious head injuries in London, and over 80% of those killed in collisions on rural roads.

References

  1. "Reported Road Casualties Great Britain: 2013: Main Results", Department for Transport, 2014
  2. "Collisions Involving Cyclists on Britain's Roads: Establishing the Causes", TRL Report PPR 445, 2009

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Man Gets Probation for Killing Bicyclist

I am simply appalled at this. This man has broken a home, killed someone, was completely an irresponsible human being and gets to sit at home, enjoy his life and pay minimally. I am taking a STAND. Yesterday on a glorious day I was riding. And a black BMW was right behind me. Way to close. Honking at me. So I stopped and called 911. Yes, she says she didn't know I had the right to a lane. I said to her, "Regardless if I was breaking the law, which I wasn't, it's ok for you to endanger me?" Police came. She got a warning. I personally promise bikers that I will take the time to call the police when I can. Because if we don't show them they can't run us over, they won't be punished. This needs to change. Full article

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6 Simple Exercises for a Strong Core

One way to develop an eye-catching mid-section, strengthen your core and back regions is to incorporate abdominal exercises that work all areas. These exercises develop your core and tighten the tummy, which is designed as a stand-alone workout or add to your circuit training workouts. I also love to do these exercises as part of my 3 and 11-day detox programs alternating with yoga or gentle walk in order to flush out the toxins and keep me moving. jack-knifeThe first exercise is what I refer to as the Jack Knife sit-up. Lay on your back. Hands and feet meet in the center. Slowly extend arms and legs away from center of body. Don't touch floor with arms or feet. Hold and bring back to center. Do these for 1 minute. Try to do 25-30 reps. If you are a beginner, bend the knees and bring them up to midline and back down.     core-abdominal-and-lower-back-exercises-1Leg extension with a workout bar is to use a bar and hold the bar in front of you and just lower the legs while keeping the hands and workout bar in place overhead at waist level. Drop legs 6” from floor, hold then bring back up to the bar. If you don’t have a bar, place hands under lower back and lower legs to floor, approximately 6” from the floor and back up to mid-line. Do each exercise for 1 minute/rest for 1 minute. core-abdominal-and-lower-back-exercises-2Now take the same bar and alternate it from side to side in order to work the oblique. If you are a beginner, stop when you need to rest and then continue to complete as many reps as you can in 1 minute.       bike12Another great abdominal exercise you can do if you don't have a bar is to simply do the Classic Scissor Crunch. Lay on floor, hands on head not behind head, so you can avoid pulling the neck and alternate legs to elbow. Right elbow to left knee and reverse, count that as 1 rep. What I refer to as a double count. Do for 1 minute. 25-30 reps. plank1The next exercise is great for your whole core, The Classic Plank. When done with the scissor crunch, flip over on your mat, place hands under shoulders, lift lower body in straight line, flat back and hold for 1 minute. situpsThe last one is the Classic Crunch. Lay down on your mat, knees bent, hands on head so you don't pull the neck, lift ½ way and back down, repeat. Complete as many as you can in 1 minute. Complete all exercises, each one for 1 minute/1 minute rest between exercises. When you are done with all exercises, you will have completed one (1) circuit. Rest after each circuit for 2-4 minutes. Repeat circuit 2 more times up to 5. Complete 2-3 times a week and you on your way to an eye-catching mid-section, while strengthening your core and lower back region.

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Is there “healthy triathlon competition” in “healthy marriage”? A little race report.

It's official.  He is faster than me! At least at the mini sprint in a pool. I've been doing triathlon for two years. My husband started a couple of months ago. I thought I had more time to be faster than him.  NOPE. I guess the lesson is some of us are FAST. And some of us are NOT. Another lesson? I might be a bit too competitive. Because here are my thoughts ... As you can see on the times, the only place I'm faster is in transition.  So NO.  I'm not going to purchase tri shorts so he's faster.  I'm not going to purchase him yanks, so he's faster.  I'm not going to race in the same swim lane with him because I might be tempted to kick him, slow him down a bit. HA!

He is officially on his own!

My race report. I'd like to throw out that in my heat was...a fast rabbit, a gazelle and two other really fast go getters. SWIM: I didn't have much anxiety in the pool. Funny how pool swimming makes me more anxious than open water swimming. I think perhaps because I LOVE nature. I wasn't any faster than usual. That sort of irritated me. But heck, I have swam 4 times since my Ironman. hahaha, silly lesson on unrealistic expectations. BIKE: I need stronger legs. Though I can certainly go faster on my bike. Cybex bikes sux. RUN: Good run. Nice fast pace for me, 8:40 ish. Pain free. No throw up. It's no fun running all by yourself because everyone else is already done. HA! BOOM! Next race, getting sub 50 if it kills me.

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For those that bike…and have extra friends

abscess

Have you ever been plagued by very uncomfortable and unsightly skin abscesses?

Last year I struggled with it under my chin. In a bad way. From the bike helmet strap. It was REALLY embarrassing. This year during Ironman training, aka, lots more miles...I developed a case in the bikini area that really SUCKED. BAD. I couldn't get my mind to shut up doing the long rides because I was in decent and relentless pain the entire time! The tri shorts/seams had a bit to do with it but the main culprit was... Not just ingrown hairs but a skin condition called Hidradentitis suppurativa. Which is something I have struggled with my entire life, just to a lesser degree as compared to during intense training. Lots of people have it. Read here. I'm sooooo RELIEVED to be done with this issue.  Here is what I did.
Purchased a garlic supplement.
Garlic is highly antibacterial. But doesn't kill our own good gut bugs and end up giving you...(you know). I bought Kyolic Aged Garlic Extract with Vit C, Astragalus, and mushrooms. Took a coupe of weeks to really knock it out. I eat really well and all, and noticed a difference. Nature's medicine. Check it out on Amazon.
Exfoliated
I exfoliated with Yes to Tomatoes Daily Clarifying Cleanser. Yes to Tomatoes rocks on the face too!
Bought different bike shorts.
The material in the groin is wide, no seams in the crease of the groin.
Started switching shorts
I began to switch shorts from swim to bike (and bike to run) for practices and plan to do the same during the race. You can get the same Yes to Tomatoes face wipes. Very refreshing.
Patience
This skin condition can be a systemic thing, so be patient.  Add more garlic and onions into your diet.  Both very good for you and antibacterial in it's properties.  Fixing this "surface" issue will also have secret benefits for your body, as the immune issue won't only affect the skin but other unseen things as well.
Side note:  this approach will work with teenagers with acne, etc etc etc. Side note 2:  Also.  I have been giving my dog (boxer: pron to cancer/tumors) this Garlic supplement as well and noticed a difference already in her skin! Happy riding!

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